Archive for the ‘San Diego NWR’ Category

March 21st, 2018

Victoria Touchstone Named the 2018 National Wildlife Refuge System Employee of the Year


Victoria Touchstone Named the 2018 National Wildlife Refuge System
Employee of the Year
March 21, 2018

Washington, D.C.​ The National Wildlife Refuge Association has named Victoria Touchstone as our 2018 National Wildlife Refuge System Employee of the Year. Ms. Touchstone is a Refuge Planner for the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex in southern California, and has developed and implemented critical projects that have not only benefited wildlife populations,but also created greater public access for the community.

In her sixteen years with the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Ms. Touchstone has completed multiple major habitat restoration projects, has drafted and finalized four major Comprehensive Conservations Plans for four different refuges, and expanded public access. “Ms. Touchstone’s personal dedication to conserving habitats and protecting wildlife at the San Diego Refuge Complex exemplifies her commitment to her community and to the National Wildlife Refuge System,” said Geoffrey Haskett, President of the National Wildlife Refuge Association. “But her commitment to wildlife conservation extends beyond her role with the Refuge System as she rescues wildlife and uses her backyard as a refuge.”

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December 12th, 2017

Hike ‘n Help YOUR SD National Wildlife Refuge

Hike ‘n Help
YOUR
SD National Wildlife Refuge

(photo San Diego Reader)

Saturday, December 16, 2017 9am-12pm:
SDNWR Hike ‘n Help

Join EDI and the US Fish and Wildlife Service this Saturday (FWS) for a hike to learn about the habitat, then lend a hand to help with a current restoration project. In partnership with the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Program and the California Coastal Conservancy, EDI and FWS are removing weeds and installing native plants along the Sweetwater River. Refuge Manager Jill Terp will walk you through the project area, share info about the creatures and habitats that will benefit, then we’ll rake to remove dry non-native grasses from some of the planting areas. Wear a hat, suncreen and long pants. Bring a water bottle. Water, drinks, and snacks will be provided. 
Follow  Millar Ranch Road south from Campo Road in Ranch San Diego for .2 (2/10) mile to gate on right. Turn in at gate and you will be directed to parking.

Please RSVP! 619-654-3793 or  info@earthdiscovery.org

July 20th, 2017

Refuges in the spotlight

Our San Diego Refuges are highlighted in the California Refuges spotlight on the FWS home page here.

Also, here is a promo video featuring our refuges:

April 3rd, 2017

San Diego’s efforts to save the Quino checkerspot butterfly are working

John Wilkens

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/zoo/sd-me-quino-checkerspot-20170331-story.html

An effort to save the Quino checkerspot butterfly from extinction appears to be working.

Biologists from several local agencies returned recently to a hillside in the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge, where they had placed butterfly larvae in specially constructed pods over the winter, and found that nature had taken its course: Quino checkerspots were flitting about.

“Observing more than 35 butterflies flying in one day on the reintroduction site is extraordinary,” said Paige Howorth, associate curator of invertebrates at the San Diego Zoo. “It’s a welcome measure of hope, after years of drought and uncertainty for this species.”

Quino checkerspots used to be among the most commonly seen butterflies in Southern California, their range extending from the coast near Ventura County, east to the Tehachapi Mountains and south to northern Baja.

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March 31st, 2017

Manatee Reclassified from Endangered to Threatened

Manatee Reclassified from Endangered to Threatened as Habitat Improves and Population Expands – Existing Federal Protections Remain in Place

Partnerships bringing giant sea cow back from brink of extinction

WASHINGTON – On the heels of Manatee Appreciation Day, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced the downlisting of the West Indian manatee from endangered to threatened. Notable increases in manatee populations and improvements in its habitat allowed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to change the species’ status under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The downlisting comes after diverse conservation efforts and collaborations by Florida and other manatee states, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Caribbean nations, public and private organizations and citizens, there have been notable increases in manatee populations and improvements in its habitat.

“The Fish and Wildlife Service has worked hand in hand with state and local governments, businesses, industry, and countless stakeholders over many years to protect and restore a mammal that is cherished by people around the world,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Without this type of collaboration and the commitment of state and local partners, this downlisting would not have been possible.”

In its review, FWS considered the status of the West Indian manatee throughout its range, which includes the Florida manatee subspecies, found primarily in the southeastern United States, and the Antillean manatee, found in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Central America, northern South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. The downlisting means that the manatee is no longer considered in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range, but is likely to become so in the foreseeable future without continued ESA protections. (more…)

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